Creating Your Farm Garden Life

Moving to a rural farming community is to come faced with how creative many farmers are. It’s not just the choices made in designing their lands … positioning their crops… color choices of barns and out buildings… it’s the very act of intention. “I will now grow something that is of use to myself and others.”

I listened to “Julie Burstein: 4 lessons in creativity” because I need to search for things that feed my “Creative Mind” as many times a week as possible and in today’s world, we are inundated with media choices that excite every part of us other than our creativity. “Consume.. be at war with others … sooth your anxieties with shopping, drugs, and porn in the attempt to safely satisfy our need for human passion.”

100 yr pot put bak with gold lacqureBurstein used Japanese Raku to illustrate that in the process, we often have to let what happens—happen. (Click on the link above and view the video.) Wonderful things come out letting go of our need for safety… of being “right”… of being aware of that there are things I can control and things I have to let go of … because they happen all the time. The weather, deer eating what I don’t want them to eat… a ground hog or an owl in barns where I don’t want them to be.  “Creativity grows out of everyday experiences… including letting go. It also grows out of the broken places and the best way humans learn is through stories,” states Burstein. To tell those stories… through art, writing, sculpture, dance, is to be aware that all stories, novels, and songs are somehow about Attachment and the lack thereof, so putting other people at the center of your work. Burstein list four aspects we truly need in our alienated world in order to create the life we wish to move manifest… to create:

  1. Pay attention to the world around us…experience life instead of cell phones and twitter posts. Being open to the experience to what might change you is the first thing you must embrace.
  2.  Embrace—not necessarily overcome—your challenges… learn from them instead of being destroyed or turned off by them. Some artist’s most powerful work comes out of elements of life that are the most difficult. Acceptance leads to wisdom.
  3. Embrace loss—looking squarely at rejection, at war, at heartbreak, and at death… standing between what we see and what we hope for. (“The tragic gap is inevitable”… but you can hold the tension that comes out of it and create something beautiful.) Pushing up against the limits of what you can do can help you find your own voice, as well as your own genre.
  4. And of course opening to your passions. The need to get to work … that sense of urgency. The passionate obstinacy that compels us to create something out of our experience… cathartic in its transformation of trauma or symbolic in its beauty.”

Don’t let worries about not being perfect or strong or smart enough stop you. Forget about finding the PERFECT place that will have perfect neighbors. Inperfection is “perfect” for the creative person. That one-hundred year old Japanese pot that still shows the creators fingerprints was made more beautiful because when it was broken, the owner put it back together with gold lacquer … emphasizing the broken places… and hence, it’s story is still worthy of being told. What’s yours? What will be the story that leads you to plant a seed in your urban, suburban, or rural garden? Who will come to share the meal… a blue bird… an old tired aunt… a child not yet born?

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